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Ever wonder what is SHOUJU ANIME?

Ever wonder what is SHOUJU ANIME? You might be surprised on little you know about it but how much you love the anime series and movies associated to it..

Shoujo is the word used to describe anime that specifically appeals to young girls. The shows are usually deeper in content, focusing on romantic interests and friendships rather than action and ending with some kind of personal growth and development. They of course still contain their fair share of action (See Magical Girl genre) but tend to go beyond the Shonen approach to strength and defeat as sole motivators. This, like Shonen is more or less a demographic - the rules tend not to be absolute

Another definition for shoujo refers to manga marketed to a female audience roughly between the ages of 10 and 18. The name romanizes the Japanese "little female".


Shōjo manga covers many subjects in a variety of narrative and graphic styles, from historical drama to science fiction - often with a strong focus on human and romantic relationships and emotions.[1] Strictly speaking, shōjo manga does not comprise a style or a genre per se, but rather indicates a target demographic

Japanese magazines specifically for girls, known as shōjo magazines, first appeared in 1903 with the founding of Shōjo kai (少女界?, Girls' World), and continued with others such as Shōjo Sekai (少女世界?, Girls' World) (1906) and the long-running Shōjo no tomo (少女の友?, Girls' Friend) (1908).

Simple, single-page manga had begun to appear in these magazines by 1910, and by the 1930s more sophisticated humor-strips had become an essential feature of most girls' magazines. The most popular manga, Katsuji Matsumoto's Kurukuru Kurumi-chan (くるくるクルミちゃん), debuted on the pages of Shōjo no tomo (少女の友) in 1938. As World War II progressed, however, "comics, perhaps regarded as frivolous, began to disappear".

Postwar shōjo manga, such as Shosuke Kurakane's popular Anmitsu Hime,[8] initially followed the pre-war pattern of simple humor-strips. But Osamu Tezuka's postwar revolution, introducing intense drama and serious themes to children's manga, spread quickly to shōjo manga, particularly after the enormous success of his seminal Ribon no kishi (リボンの騎士 Princess Knight)